Soap Nut Review

Screen Shot 2016-06-25 at 5.11.24 PMFirst what are Soap nuts?  They are actually a fruit and contain large amounts of saponins in their shell.

Soap nuts, also known as soapberries, washing nuts and wash berries are from the Sapindus Tree these trees grow in India and Nepal.
Ecozone Soap nuts – Indian Wash nuts – replaces laundry powder and detergents – great value 1kg bag – up to 330 washes

The Pros

  • Natural
  • Biodegradable
  • Petroleum Free
  • Reusable
  • Safe on delicates
  • Mild enough for babies clothes and diapers
  • No skin irritations

The Cons

  • Need hot or warm water
  • Have to pre-treat stains
  • More time consuming

Soap nuts do not have chemicals like the detergents, so they do not whiten whites, but you can add some borax to your whites to do that.

I think the pros outweigh the cons because soapnuts do things naturally that detergents don’t.  Washing with soap nuts I find my clothes are softer, and I rarely get eczema flare ups.

To me there are healthier and safer, so if my whites are not as white as they should be I don’t mind.  If I do I add borax or baking soda to my wash.



You can also try using soap nuts in cold water – to do this I soak them in hot water for 10 minutes to steep.  I also add a few drops of lavender for a nice scent.

Soap nuts are truly non-toxic and the best laundry option I have found for sensitive skin, next to grating Olive Oil Soap and adding water.  These nut are very affordable and will do more than one wash, with no suds they do not leave any residue in the washing machine.

Avalon Bay EcoWash Portable Non-Electric Washing Machine

Using them is easy just plop 5 or 6 of them into a muslin bag and place in the washer if you are using hot water.  If not then soak the nuts in the bag in hot, hot water for 10 minutes and then put the tea and the bag in the washer with cold water.

You will find no skin irritation and your clothes will be much softer.

Below are some mini washing machines for the dorm or the summer cabin.  They range in price from $75.00 to $269.99.  All electric except for the Avalon Bay which would be a great machine for the summer cabin and very reasonable priced at $75.00.

© 2016 – 2018, Tes. All rights reserved.

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16 Responses to Soap Nut Review

  1. Julius says:

    Hello,

    I’ve been reading your website for a while now, and I’m really enjoying it! I learned a lot of interesting things about soap and the process of making it on your own.

    I actually never heard of soap nuts, but it looks very interesting. I like to do things naturally because there’s little to no chances that my body is gonna respond negatively. Unfortunately, the price of these soap nuts is definitely higher than the regular soap but despite that, I’ll try it. I think it’s worth the money.

    Julius

    • Teresa says:

      Hi Julius, I’m glad you are enjoying the website. The price of the soap nuts is actually cheaper than regular laundry detergent if you look at a 1 kg bag of soap nuts will give you about 300 washes and Tide Pods 1.5 kg will give you only 40 was and the 1kg powder 30 loads. So if you look at the prices, it is actually cheaper to use the soap nuts.

  2. Evie says:

    I’d never heard of soap nuts before but it sounds like they do a great job. I’m slightly allergic to soap powder so have to use a gentler non biological powder in my washing machine. These sound better. And I assume that because they don’t produce suds etc that they might extend washing machine life as no chemicals to eat through or gunk things up?

    • Teresa says:

      Yes Evie, no chemicals. I didn’t think about extending the life of a washing machine, but I bet your right, and without the chemicals that your find in detergents it is safer for your skin.

  3. james says:

    Wow, such an interesting topic. I always thought soap was made from animal fat and that was it. Very intriguing on the process of using cleaner materials for soap. Too bad you have to use hot or warm water. Be very interested to know the difference between this soap and the original that I am use to. I wonder how big of a difference it makes?

    • Teresa says:

      Hi James, I usually use warm water, but I have talked to people that say it works in cold as well. You just have to soak the nuts in hot water before throwing them in the machine. I haven’t tried it myself. I find the soap nuts work equally as well as the detergent I used to use. I’m very happy with them.

  4. Mariah says:

    Wow, I’ve never heard of soap nuts! Pretty cool that there are completely natural things we can use to do laundry instead of detergent that is full of weird chemicals. Like most things in this day and age it seems, detergent is probably doing harmful things to our bodies.

    It sounds like it’s pretty easy to use the soap nuts. But I’m curious, why do you have to wash in hot water or at least soak in cold water before washing in cold?

    • Tes says:

      Hot water releases saponin. If the water is very cold the nuts have a hard time releasing enough soap to really clean clothes, so that is why it is recommend making “tea” by placing the bag with the nuts into a cup of hot water and letting it sit up to 10 – 15 minutes, then add the water and bag into the washing machine. 

      If you have very dirty garments then it’s a good idea to wash them in warmer water as this helps to release more soap from the nuts. 

  5. Janis S says:

    This is right up my ally! I love everything having to do with all natural products, and if I can make my own, that’s even better! I’ve always wanted to learn how to make my own soap, and your article is very helpful! I’m definitely going to have to try this, especially because of how sensitive my skin is!

  6. Huy says:

    This is a very interesting article, I have never heard of soap nuts before reading this. It is nice that there are natural alternative to all the carcinogenic detergents that are available out there on the market. The soap nuts arr a bit pricey but I saw you stated its up to 330 washes thats quite a bit. I am 100% positive I wouldn’t be able to get that many washes out that same cost in detergent. Thanks for the very informative article!

  7. Hong says:

    Very interesting article. Your article has been an eye opener. I’ve never heard of soap nuts. I didn’t even know they existed. I am always interested in learning about using things from nature. My hands get very dry from using regular soap. I know it contains a lot of harsh chemicals that’s harmful to your skin. Can soap nuts cause any irritation? Can it be used as regular hand soap?

    • Tes says:

      Soap nuts are a gentle cleanser, I have not heard of anyone I know having an allergic reaction to them and research says it’s very rare.  Soap nuts are also used to make shampoo and body washes, so I don’t see why you couldn’t use it as a hand soap.  I would soap the nuts in water and then use that water as a hand wash.

  8. Paul says:

    Dear Teresa,

    Thanks a lot for the informative post and very helpful insights.

    To be honest, after watching Dr. Raymond Francis videos on Youtube I came to know the dangerous effect of the chemicals in our soap can cause us. As a result I was discussing about the chemicals and how to go for the natural soap’s with my wife.

    Your post is really helpful. Since I am from India when you said the benefits of Soap nut and it’s available in India I was searching for its name in my mother tongue and I am very surprised that my grandmother used it and I used it in my childhood.

    Thanks a lot for helping me to rediscover this great soap nut. We forgot to use it and now realized its value via your post and going to purchase and prepare our own Natural soap.

    Wishing you great success!

    Paul

    • Tes says:

      Thanks Paul, that’s wonderful that your grandmother used soap nuts.  So you know value of them and it’s great to hear you’ll be using them again.  All the best to you.

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