Activated Charcoal Soap Recipe

Charcoal (Black Soap) Recipe

charcoal soap, soap recipe, making soap, handmade soap

Here is some charcoal soap I have curing – it will cure for approximately 4 weeks before being labelled for sale

Activated Charcoal added to your soap can really help your skin. 

This homemade activated charcoal soap can actually helps to open the skins pores and draw out dirt while at the same time detoxifying the skin.  This bar soap is one that sells year round and is often used for mature skin as well as teenagers suffering from acne.

People often ask if the bathtub or towels will be stained black from this soap.  My answer is no.  I have never had anything stained black from this soap and I use it on a regular basis.

Charcoal has been used for many years as a detoxifier, not only in soap but as poultices to keep wounds clean and as an antidote to poisons.

You can read more about it here:

The Benefits Of Charcoal Soap

To make Charcoal soap use  Recipe #1

Recipe #1

  • 1800 Grams Olive Oil
  • 450 Grams Coconut Oil
  • 300 Grams Palm Kernal Oil
  • 250 Grams Palm Oil
  • 250 Grams Grapeseed Oil
  • 420 Grams Lye (Sodium Hydroxide)
  • 4.5 Cups Water
  • for a scented bar, add:
  • 2 ounces of scent
  • for charcoal soap add 8 tsp of Activated Charcoal.
  • the Charcoal should be added once the lye/water mixture is added to the oils and mixed thoroughly.

I don’t normally add scent to my charcoal bar as it is a facial bar, although I know people do add tea tree because it is an effective essential oil in the treatment of acne.

It is my personal preference to not scent this bar as I am usually selling it to women with more mature skin looking for a bar that will help to clean and reduce the size of their pores rather than as a treatment for acne.

Here is a recipe for the treatment of Acne – Acne Bar

Basic Cold Process Soap Making Instructions

Before starting gather all the equipment and ingredients you will need for you soap

Mixing your ingredients:

  1. Put on your protective clothing, apron, safety goggles, gloves etc
  2. Measure your water and pour it into the container you will be using for your lye/water mix
  3. Measure out your lye (sodium hydroxide)
  4. Slowly add the lye to the water, stirring to be sure it mixes well.  This should be done in a well ventilated area as the fumes can be quite strong.  This will only last for a 15 seconds or so.  Stir until the lye is completely dissolved in the water.  It will heat up to about 180 degrees and can now be put aside to cool down.
  5. While the lye/water is cooling use a scale and measure each of your soap oils and put into your stainless steel pot.
  6. Place this pot on your stove or hot plate and turn on low to heat to approximately 130 degrees.
  7. Once the oils have heated to 130 degrees take off the stove or hot plate and let them cool down to about 100 degrees.
  8. When the lye/water mix and the oils are both cooled down to about 100 degrees they are ready to be mixed.
  9. Slowly add the lye/water mix to your soap oils and stir you can use a stick blender and hand mix. Mix the soap until it traces. This is when the soap begins to thicken; you can test this by using your spoon to drizzle the liquid into the pot.  You will see a trace that stays on the surface of the soap mixture.
  10. Once the soap has traced this is the time to add your scent and color.
  11. Mix the scent and color in well
  12. Pour this mixture into the lined molds, cover with a piece of cardboard or plastic, put it to bed (place a blanket over the soap mold) and let set for a day or two.
  13. Once it has sit for a day or two, remove the soap from the mold and cut and put out to cure for 4 to 6 weeks.

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